Crowns

Crowns (caps) are restorations which replace the entire outer surface of a tooth. They encompass the whole tooth like a thimble. Crowns are used when too much of a tooth has been lost and there is not enough of the natural tooth left to hold a filling. Crowns are commonly recommended after root canal treatment to prevent the tooth from fracturing. They can also be used to improve the aesthetics of a discoloured front tooth.

Crowns can be made of a variety of materials:

  • Porcelain (tooth coloured)
  • Porcelain fused to metal (tooth coloured on the outside and the strength of the metal on the inside)
  • Gold
  • Stainless steel (silver coloured and usually used for baby teeth)

The process:

  1. Local anaesthetic is given.
  2. 1-2mm of the tooth is removed circumferentially.
  3. A mould (impression) of the tooth is taken and sent to the laboratory.
  4. A temporary crown is placed for up to two weeks until the crown is made.
  5. The temporary crown is removed and the definitive crown is cemented.

Single visit Crowns now available at Lithgow Dental Care Centre

Ceramic and Zirconia Crowns or partial ceramic crowns in a single visit. No unpleasant impression material, no temporary prosthesis and the knowledge that you have the latest technology in crown manufacturing with long term stability.

Cerec is a revolutionary new technology which enables single-visit crowns, inlays and onlays. It removes the need for uncomfortable impression taking and weeks of having temporary restorations. It uses an intra-oral scanning device to record the dimensions of your tooth. This information is sent to the computer which, with the aid of your dentist, will design your new restoration. You can then relax and watch while the Cerec machine mills your new crown, inlay or onlay.

Bridges

A bridge is a restoration used to replace a missing tooth or ‘bridge’ a gap. The procedure involves bonding a prosthetic tooth (pontic) to the natural tooth behind and/or in front of the space created by the missing tooth.

There are two types of bridges:

  1. Conventional bridge: A crown is placed on the adjacent tooth/teeth, but unlike the isolated crown described above the bridge has an extra prosthetic tooth attached to it. This is the most common type, as it is very secure and provides protection to the adjacent (abutment) tooth/teeth also.
  2. Resin bonded bridge: The prosthetic tooth is bonded to the inside of the adjacent (abutment) teeth using small metal wings.

The process:

  1. Local anaesthetic is given.
  2. Some of the adjacent tooth is removed to allow the final bridge to adapt neatly onto it.
  3. A mould (impression) of the teeth is taken and sent to the laboratory.
  4. In the case of conventional bridges, a temporary crown is sometimes placed on the abutment tooth for up to two weeks until the bridge is made.
  5. When the bridge returns from the lab the temporary crown is removed and the definitive bridge is cemented.

Veneers

A veneer is a thin restoration which sticks to the front of your natural tooth. They are usually used to improve the aesthetics of discoloured, spaced or fractured front teeth. They are usually made of composite or porcelain. Veneers can be direct (built up by hand directly onto the tooth) or indirect (made in the laboratory and cemented on).

The process:

Direct

  1. Local anaesthetic is sometimes given.
  2. Old fillings can be removed.
  3. The front of the tooth is often prepared to aid with adhesion of the new veneer.
  4. The front of the tooth is built up with composite resin to match the adjacent teeth.

Indirect

  1. Local anaesthetic is sometimes given.
  2. 1-2mm of the front of the tooth is removed.
  3. A mould (impression) of the tooth is taken and sent to the laboratory.
  4. A temporary veneer is sometimes placed for up to two weeks until the definitive veneer is made.
  5. When the veneer returns from the laboratory the temporary veneer is removed and the definitive one is cemented.